Pablo Tesio hopes his simple, bold and graphic illustrations will stir up emotion

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In a world full of constant information, Pablo TesioThe illustrations are a refreshing break from it all. Simple and bold, it’s an aesthetic he adores because of his fusion of artisan techniques and digital simplicity. “Small imperfections in the lines or the use of heavy textures can transform digital art into more ‘palpable’ visuals,” he shares. “It’s more intimate and unique.”

It’s also a style that comes naturally Pablo, who was born in a small town in Argentina and immediately fell in love with the process of creating ideas. Growing up, for example, he nurtured a curiosity for the world through his activities in music, painting, writing and drawing; he later became a creator of copyrights for major global brands. These experiences allowed Pablo to surpass himself in communicating complex subjects in a straightforward and compelling manner – a skill that has transpired today through his graphic illustrations.



Covid Bar © Pablo Tesio

Curiosity is the key © Pablo Tesio



Curiosity is the key © Pablo Tesio

“Color is also very important,” he continues. “I try to keep my color palettes at three or four colors at most.” For Pablo, certain nuances have the power to raise awareness of a particular subject or message. Or, it can “completely spoil a beautiful image”. To avoid the latter, Pablo focuses his attention on both the idea and the mood of the drawing, pinning certain colors to different emotions. Bold reds and oranges will be used for urgent matters, while light pinks and blues will represent a calm or calming subject.

While working with a specific idea, Pablo will kick off the process by making a list of all the different things he could include, whether it’s in his head or by hand. “Then I try to connect them in an unusual way,” he says. “The fun part is making it interesting by combining them in a new way.” For example, if it’s an article about bars and requiring proof of vaccination, Pablo will go for something a little more surprising than the typical cocktail or syringe – he strives to get these. “ah-ha” moments of his audience.

Summer in Madrid © Pablo Tesio



Summer in Madrid © Pablo Tesio

Mood changes © Pablo Tesio



Mood changes © Pablo Tesio

Mood Swings, for example, is a recent piece based on his experience of waking up and feeling sad one morning. The play sees a headless figure swinging between two faces – one smiling and the other looking grim. He adds: “You know … when good old existentialism hits you with the first sip of morning coffee. After breakfast I ran to the office, started reading emails and I forgot it. up! ”, and we started to think about how our busy lives don’t even give us time to understand our feelings. We went from happy to numb to excited, like we were all doing emo-parkour. I’ve received a lot of messages about this, so I guess that personal sentiment resonated with a lot of people. “

Most importantly, Pablo believes that illustration has the power to connect with people and ultimately to stir emotion – “to spark a thought, a question, a laugh, or even an action,” he concludes. “I think those ‘a-ha!’ Moments can untie emotional knots or unlock self-understanding. It can change the way we see things or perceive different things. That is why consumerism and political campaigns depend on it so much. It is a big problem. “

© Pablo Tesio



© Pablo Tesio

Fresh ideas © Pablo Tesio



Fresh ideas © Pablo Tesio

Relaxed in the event of a pandemic © Pablo Tesio



Relaxed in the event of a pandemic © Pablo Tesio

Surgical station © Pablo Tesio



Surgical station © Pablo Tesio

Taming crypto © Pablo Tesio



Taming crypto © Pablo Tesio

Look at yourself © Pablo Tesio



Look at yourself © Pablo Tesio



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