Illustrations – SAMT 2010 http://samt2010.org/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 13:26:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://samt2010.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-1-32x32.png Illustrations – SAMT 2010 http://samt2010.org/ 32 32 Petra Braun’s playful figurative illustrations celebrate the “badass” women in her life https://samt2010.org/petra-brauns-playful-figurative-illustrations-celebrate-the-badass-women-in-her-life/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 07:15:00 +0000 https://samt2010.org/petra-brauns-playful-figurative-illustrations-celebrate-the-badass-women-in-her-life/ Petra, a freelance illustrator and skilled graphic designer, has created artwork for an array of impressive clients, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Penguin Random House and Dorling Kindersley, to name a few. But even if she has always drawn and created since her childhood, she did not grow up in an artist’s house and […]]]>

Petra, a freelance illustrator and skilled graphic designer, has created artwork for an array of impressive clients, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Penguin Random House and Dorling Kindersley, to name a few. But even if she has always drawn and created since her childhood, she did not grow up in an artist’s house and did not know for a long time that it could lead to a job.

“My parents had a farm and my life was filled with animals and plants, as were my drawings,” Petra told Creative Boom. “My professional aspiration at the time was to become a veterinarian.” However, a school trip to an art exhibition at the age of 12 took another path in her life. “We saw an exhibition with paintings by Marc Chagall, and I remember how fascinated I was,” she reveals. “I had never seen paintings in real life and I was the last child to leave the exhibition.”

When deciding on a career path, Petra chose to become a graphic designer because it seemed like a way to get steady employment from her passion for art. After graduating, she worked for a time in an advertising agency before deciding to study painting at the University of the Arts in Linz, Austria.



Petra uses painterly digital brushes because she doesn’t want a flat aesthetic

Petra went freelance in 2019 after contacting various magazine publishers and visiting the Frankfurt Book Fair



Petra went freelance in 2019 after contacting various magazine publishers and visiting the Frankfurt Book Fair

Of that time, she says: “At university, I mainly worked with oil and acrylic paint, but I also did ink drawings and stone and fabric objects. The subjects of the work I created there were very women-centric and the artists who inspired me the most were female artists like Louise Bourgeois and Kiki Smith.”

A passion to focus on strong, empowered women is a recurring motif in Petra’s work. And while she is inspired by women who have done remarkable things in their lives despite the societal boundaries they have faced, she is also influenced by women in her everyday life.

“I often notice how badass the women around me are, how many different things they handle and how they hold everything together,” she explains. “It’s impressive how many different roles they have to play and it’s a shame how rarely this is recognized and appreciated in society.

“Seeing the accomplishments of the women around me is wonderful and encouraging. I am a very introverted person and was very shy as a child. Having role models and seeing how other women around me are succeeding was, and is always, very motivating for me to get out of my comfort zone, so I’m always happy to be able to work on a project featuring a model woman.”

Every September, Petra takes part in the Instagram Powerful Women Week Challenge.



Every September, Petra takes part in the Instagram Powerful Women Week Challenge.

Another reason Petra needs to focus on and empower women is because of the restrictions they still face. “Women are told a lot how to behave, how to present themselves, what they can do and what they can archive,” she says. “The systems we live in are still built in such a way that women take care of their families rather than pursue their career goals. As long as men earn more for the same work, this will not change.

“Furthermore, women’s rights are not a sure thing. It is imperative to claim and fight for these rights as they can easily be taken away overnight. This is what we have seen recently with the right to abortion in different countries. Rights, in general, are not something we can take for granted. Therefore, I think it is essential to empower women to be confident, to live their lives as they wish and pursue their dreams.

In her art, Petra likes to show women confident in their bodies and standing up for what they want. “I like to empower and empower them. Women are often brought up to put their needs behind them, so I think it’s important to put them front and center and matter.”

True to her word, Petra does just that by hosting the “Powerful Women Week” Instagram Challenge every September with fellow illustrators. “During the week, we show on our accounts selected works created for the challenge in order to increase the visibility of the artists participating in the challenge.”

This project led to a card game (thanks to Lisa Den Teuling, the founder of “Powerful Women Week”), where 60 female artists from around the world contributed an illustration created for the challenge, along with a motivational quote. . “A portion of the proceeds from the card game are donated to a charity called Mama Cash, which supports women, girls, and transgender and intersex people around the world.”

Petra describes her style as figurative, feminine and playful



Petra describes her style as figurative, feminine and playful

Inspired by her work and thinking of following in Petra’s footsteps by entering the world of illustration? She advises that freelance editorial illustration is the starting point. “It’s easier to find contacts than in other markets,” she explains.

“You can check the imprint of magazines you think your work would be suitable for and find the names of art directors or editors. AOI also sells contact lists on their website. Send an email with a message polite explaining why you want to Include some examples of your work as well as links to your website and social media accounts.

“Don’t be discouraged if you don’t get an immediate response. These people are very busy. is not what they are looking for.”

Most importantly, Petra recommends submitting work that reflects the topics that interest you. In her case, it would be about empowered women, and that led to work in that area.

“Additionally, you might think about what editors and art directors need for the magazine. For example, if there’s always a supplement in the magazine, feel free to come up with an idea for it. The same goes for publishing houses and ideas for books.”

Petra also likes to create patterns because they help her get out of artistic blockages



Petra also likes to create patterns because they help her get out of artistic blockages

Powerful Women’s Week-inspired card game raises money for charity called Mama Cash

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Art for Freedom: more cartoons and illustrations after Xel2 https://samt2010.org/art-for-freedom-more-cartoons-and-illustrations-after-xel2/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 20:53:24 +0000 https://samt2010.org/art-for-freedom-more-cartoons-and-illustrations-after-xel2/ By El Toque HAVANA TIMES – About twenty graphic designers —Cuban and foreigners— responded to a call from El Toque, in response to the denunciation of the closure of the Sunday graphic humor supplement Xel2, due to pressure from the security organs of the State. El Toque’s request posted on social media read: “We ask […]]]>

By El Toque

HAVANA TIMES – About twenty graphic designers —Cuban and foreigners— responded to a call from El Toque, in response to the denunciation of the closure of the Sunday graphic humor supplement Xel2, due to pressure from the security organs of the State.

El Toque’s request posted on social media read: “We ask you to help us so that they don’t get away with this time, that they don’t block the publication of graphic humor in the independent Cuban press. .

The works refer to artistic censorship, the closure of Xel2 and the defense of spaces for creativity and freedom of expression. They reached us via our e-mail ([email protected]) and social networks.

Among the best-known Cuban illustrators who have donated their works are Lázaro Saavedra (Cuban National Prize for Plastic Arts 2014), Gustavo Rodríguez “Garrincha” and Angel Boligan “Boligan”, all enjoying significant national and international recognition.

Members of Xel2 who are outside Cuba also answered the call: Ramsés Morales, Fabián Sotolongo, Brady Izquierdo and Alen Lauzán.

The international collaboration came from Mexico through Veracruz artist Gogo, who specializes in illustration and design.

Artists from other artistic manifestations — such as the visual arts (Yulier Rodriguez “YulierP”, Camila Lobón, Hamlet Toledo and Julio Llopiz-Casal) — also submitted their works.

The state security organs of the Cuban government will not be able to silence the creative freedom of Cuban artists through harassment, threats or blackmail.

Enjoy this great virtual exhibition, which is a gesture of protest and solidarity.

Read more about Cuba here on Havana Times

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Work with Scheme clients on our new website artwork https://samt2010.org/work-with-scheme-clients-on-our-new-website-artwork/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 15:07:08 +0000 https://samt2010.org/work-with-scheme-clients-on-our-new-website-artwork/ September 06, 2022 | Plan news Did you notice anything new on our website? We introduced new illustrations and worked with “With Not For”, a creative talent agency, to find the graphic designer to design them for us. With Not For, the goal is to provide employment and empowerment to people with disabilities and connect […]]]>

Did you notice anything new on our website? We introduced new illustrations and worked with “With Not For”, a creative talent agency, to find the graphic designer to design them for us.

With Not For, the goal is to provide employment and empowerment to people with disabilities and connect employers and recruiters to talent with disabilities. We spoke to one of the founders to find out a bit more.

With Not For was founded during the COVID-19 pandemic by Kelly Gordon, a disabled wheelchair user and entrepreneur, and Emma Gardner, who has extensive experience helping workplaces evolve to include disability in their values and their culture.

Both are mobility program customers, with Emma renting a Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle (WAV), while Kelly has been in the program for nearly 10 years and currently has a WAV Drive From Wheelchair.

Before founding With Not For in lockdown, Kelly worked for many years in the football industry and even previously owned a football club.

Of his inspiration to start the business, Kelly says, “We identified the need to help talented people with disabilities get their dream jobs and access those roles they may not have thought were available. for them. I think people with disabilities tend to be super creative and productive and there’s such a talent bank out there.

One such talent was Jessica Oddi, who, with help from With Not For, was chosen to produce the illustrations for the updated Motability Scheme website.

Jessica is a freelance graphic designer and full-time electric wheelchair user based in Canada. “We’re still doing four o’clock calls and briefings with her – but she’s awesome!” said Kelly.

“With Jess’s personal style, she is very keen to represent as much diversity as possible, including race, different body shapes and sizes, or disability. It’s something she’s really proud of.

You can see more of Jessica’s work on Instagram by searching oddi.jessica

Although With Not For has gone from strength to strength since its inception, Kelly says there’s still a lot of work to be done.

“We are always looking for new partners and talents to work with.”

“Our goal as a company is to ensure that talent with disabilities can work on any file, not just disability-related files. We put talent forward for all kinds of briefs and opportunities. We’ve really grown the business over the last year and believe it’s important for people to understand and embrace disabled talent as well as disabled consultants when looking to be more inclusive.

If you want to learn more about With Not For, or maybe even pitch your talents, search for WNF_recruits on Instagram.

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Feel the lure of the slow life with thoughtful illustrations by Morgane Fadanelli https://samt2010.org/feel-the-lure-of-the-slow-life-with-thoughtful-illustrations-by-morgane-fadanelli/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 08:13:06 +0000 https://samt2010.org/feel-the-lure-of-the-slow-life-with-thoughtful-illustrations-by-morgane-fadanelli/ Is there a better feeling than flipping through a coloring book filled in perfectly within the lines? This soothing satisfaction is exactly the feeling one would expect when perusing the work of Lyon-based illustrator Morgane Fadanelli. Of course, Morgane’s work goes beyond the meditative practice of coloring books – although the illustrator once wanted to […]]]>

Is there a better feeling than flipping through a coloring book filled in perfectly within the lines? This soothing satisfaction is exactly the feeling one would expect when perusing the work of Lyon-based illustrator Morgane Fadanelli. Of course, Morgane’s work goes beyond the meditative practice of coloring books – although the illustrator once wanted to pursue a somewhat related career as a student: working on children’s books.

Since then, the illustrator has ventured into other fields. Today, Morgane is “happy to explore the diversity of projects that illustration has to offer”, creating editorial work for French magazines like mint and, more recently, illustrations for pride month appearing on the other side of the tramway in Lyon. If you return to Morgane’s work regularly – as we have for the past few months – one thing you may notice is an unmistakable use of texture. While the linework remains uniform, stable, and largely geometric, the hues between them are pleasingly speckled, almost tea-stained in spots.

According to Morgane, this signature style is best achieved with liquid ink. Breaking things down a bit further, Morgane says: “I always start a new painting by sketching out my ideas on paper which I will clean up and use as a base for the painting (I use a light table to [avoid] pencil marks and preserving the gesture). From then on, the process borrows the benefits of the digital world, but only to further elevate the analog aesthetic. “I do a quick color search in Photoshop to explore the possibility of what I have in mind,” Morgane explains. “When I find the color palette, I’ll start by painting the lighter colors, then I’ll add the darker ones and the details.”

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Wenjia Wang’s Quirky Illustrations Bring Personality to Our Internal Organs https://samt2010.org/wenjia-wangs-quirky-illustrations-bring-personality-to-our-internal-organs/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 06:05:51 +0000 https://samt2010.org/wenjia-wangs-quirky-illustrations-bring-personality-to-our-internal-organs/ We like to talk about mind and body as separate things because it’s convenient and keeps us from getting locked into language knots. But deep down we know they can’t really be separated, and for many the experience of lockdown has only heightened that reality. Wenjia Wang, a Chinese-born illustrator who has lived in the […]]]>

We like to talk about mind and body as separate things because it’s convenient and keeps us from getting locked into language knots. But deep down we know they can’t really be separated, and for many the experience of lockdown has only heightened that reality.

Wenjia Wang, a Chinese-born illustrator who has lived in the United States since the age of 17, explores this specific subject in her project How Do You Feel.

“At the start of the pandemic, because of the confinement and the fear of catching the virus, I isolated myself and became almost myopic, focused on myself and what my body felt,” she recalls.

“Due to the mental strain, I realized that the mind can influence the way the body feels. Physical experience activates psychological feelings, and vice versa. This is called embodied cognition. , which is the relationship between physical experience and psychological states.”

His project therefore consists of a series of illustrations that attempt to show the reaction of the human body under the influence of the physical environment and subjective consciousness. Each design features a specific body part and its reaction to a specific environment.



© Wenjia Wang

© Wenjia Wang



© Wenjia Wang

“When I created these illustrations, I wanted my audience to feel connected with them,” says Wenjia. “So I personify the organs as a way to represent feelings, as if the organs have their own consciousness. I want the viewer to relate to the organs and feel what the organs feel.

“For example, in Eye Pressure [shown at the top of the page], the eye is greatly constricted by its own nerves, and because it is squeezed by the nerves, the eye is thus congested and covered with blood-vessels. The background is a giant digital screen containing several eye shapes representing electronic surveillance.”

Overall, she found working on the project to be a cathartic experience. “As an illustrator, being able to be true to myself and bring out my feelings and share them with others is a satisfying thing,” she says. “I hope the public will enjoy my exhibition and feel connected to my illustrations.”

© Wenjia Wang



© Wenjia Wang

© Wenjia Wang



© Wenjia Wang

The project draws a lot of attention to the freelance illustrator, who was born in China and then moved to the United States on her own at the age of 17. It was no small feat. “Living alone, away from my family, with broken English, was hard,” she recalls. But his love of art kept him going. “I have always had a passion for art and have been practicing traditional Chinese calligraphy since a young age,” she says.

Encouraged by her high school art teacher, Mrs. Rideout, she applied to art school. In 2018, she graduated from the School of Visual Arts with a major in Illustration. She recently earned an MFA in Illustration from the Fashion Institute of Technology.

© Wenjia Wang



© Wenjia Wang

© Wenjia Wang



© Wenjia Wang

A member of the Society of Illustrators, Wenjia has won awards in numerous professional illustration competitions, including 3X3 Magazine, American Illustration 39, American Illustration 40, Graphics, and MoCCA Awards of Excellence. Her work has appeared in several art festivals, including the New York Affordable Art Fair, and she has been represented by the Emmanuel Fremin Gallery. Clients include Huawei, independent musicians, galleries and local businesses.

“When I color my work, I always want to have a bright, refreshing and tender color palette,” says Wenjia. “Not for frivolous reasons, but to convey messages that can make people think or relate. shocking by the message conveyed through storytelling.”

© Wenjia Wang



© Wenjia Wang

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Explore the vivid illustrations and major collaborations of Malika Favre https://samt2010.org/explore-the-vivid-illustrations-and-major-collaborations-of-malika-favre/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 14:21:16 +0000 https://samt2010.org/explore-the-vivid-illustrations-and-major-collaborations-of-malika-favre/ Malika Favre is a French illustrator and graphic designer living in Barcelona. She was born in 1982. Her graphic art is defined by absolute minimalism within Pop Art and Op Art, and is often referred to as “Pop Art meets Op Art”. She mixes basic imagery with geometric design and has established a distinct minimalist […]]]>

Malika Favre is a French illustrator and graphic designer living in Barcelona. She was born in 1982. Her graphic art is defined by absolute minimalism within Pop Art and Op Art, and is often referred to as “Pop Art meets Op Art”. She mixes basic imagery with geometric design and has established a distinct minimalist art style via the use of positive and negative space and color, beautiful layouts, and a focus on the female form and its contours. Her distinct style has made her one of Europe’s most sought-after graphic designers. Favre’s clients include the new yorker, vogueBAFTA, Sephora and Penguin Books.




Mercé, Ayuntamiento de Barcelona CMYK,2021, Digital Illustration Image: Courtesy of Malika Favre


1. Do you consider your work to be “illustration” or “art”? Is there a difference in your opinion?

I’d rather not label it, frankly. I often remember a phrase I heard somewhere: “Art is about asking questions, design is about proving answers”. I like to think you can do both, context permitting. A New York hedging, for example, is never about giving answers. It serves as a mirror to today’s society and goes beyond the usual brief. In my practice, I try to be honest with myself, authentic with what I believe in and what I want to draw on. I feel very lucky to have reached a point where I have enough freedom to fully express myself. Some might call it illustration, others might consider it art. In the end, I’m not sure all of this really matters.



Lausanne Summer Festival, Garden-Parties, 2018, Digital Illustration, Malika Favre |  Illustrated chronicles |  STIRworld
Lausanne Summer Festival, Garden-Parties, 2018, Digital Illustration Image: Courtesy of Malika Favre


2. What is at the heart of your expression? How do you want your work to be experienced and interpreted?

Reduction and colors are at the heart of what I do. I’m obsessed with strong, shameless colors and especially the relationship between them. I see colors as an essential part of my work, a part that can really reinforce the message or the mood I’m trying to convey in a room. The mystery is also a key element. I often tend to hide stories in my work. A second layer of narration that reveals itself to the viewer. I am also fascinated by beauty. I see it as a great tool for attracting attention. Clean lines, bold shapes and limited palettes are my weapons of choice. As for its interpretation, I like the idea of ​​letting the viewer interpret the image for themselves, draw the missing lines or decide on its meaning. Once an image is there, it no longer belongs to me.



The New Yorker, SpringToMind, 2019, Digital illustration, Malika Favre |  Illustrated chronicles |  STIRworld
The New Yorker, SpringToMind, 2019, Digital Illustration Image: Courtesy of Malika Favre


3. Tell us about your creative journey – how has your style evolved over the years? What/who are your biggest influences?

Finding my style was a long and organic process. I have always been fascinated by Op Art and the mathematical principles that allow it to exist. Playing with the viewer’s perception has always been something that has fascinated me. Pop art, on the other hand, was more like a guilty pleasure: audacity, colors, accessibility, that’s what spoke to me. A style is really the sum of its parts, everything that resonates with an artist and shapes their vision. I didn’t design my own, it just happened slowly over time.



Alphabet KAMASUTRA, 2013, Digital illustration, Malika Favre |  Illustrated chronicles |  STIRworld
KAMASUTRA Alphabet, 2013, Digital illustration Image: Courtesy of Malika Favre


4. A work that you have created and of which you are particularly proud? Please share the details of how you designed it.

There were a few key projects in my career, ones that changed its course. One of my favorites was the 2013 Kamasutra alphabet for Penguin Books and the exhibition project that soon followed. I had such joy drawing these 26 letters from intertwined bodies. Also, I was just getting started and this felt like the first work that really felt like mine. At a deep level. Ironically, this also marks the moment when I decided never to accept commissions for my erotic work. I still think it’s too personal and worth protecting.




Malika Favre makes us discover her creative process Video: Courtesy of Malika Favre


5. An upcoming project that you are passionate about… or an unrealized project that is close to your heart?

I am currently illustrating a large collection of books and am very excited for its release. It was on my wish list for a long time: a legacy publishing project. As for what might come next, I feel like I’m at a transition point in my career. Part of me feels like I’ve drawn everything I wanted to draw, and I’m finding it harder and harder to get excited about illustration projects. I think my dream today would be to move on to creating objects, ceramics, sculptures, even furniture. I’m moving slowly down this path, one collaboration at a time. We’ll see what the future holds….



Portrait of Malika Favre |  Illustrated chronicles |  STIRworld
Artist Malika Favre Image: Courtesy of Malika Favre


Click here to read more about Illustrative Chronicles, a collection of STIR articles that examine illustration as a discipline for telling stories of the contemporary urban.

(Research support by Vatsala Sethi, Deputy Editorial Coordinator (Arts))

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Scientific illustrations shed light on the works of Galileo, Einstein and many more https://samt2010.org/scientific-illustrations-shed-light-on-the-works-of-galileo-einstein-and-many-more/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://samt2010.org/scientific-illustrations-shed-light-on-the-works-of-galileo-einstein-and-many-more/ Taken from Anna EscardÓ’s book Science Illustration: A history of visual knowledge from the 15th century to today, these images range from watercolors of Galileo to a sketch from Einstein’s notebook Humans August 24, 2022 By Gege Li TASCHEN THESE star science images, taken from Anna EscardÓ’s new book Science Illustration: A history of visual […]]]>

Taken from Anna EscardÓ’s book Science Illustration: A history of visual knowledge from the 15th century to today, these images range from watercolors of Galileo to a sketch from Einstein’s notebook

Humans


August 24, 2022

TASCHEN

THESE star science images, taken from Anna EscardÓ’s new book Science Illustration: A history of visual knowledge from the 15th century to today (published by Taschen), are more than a feast for the eyes.

The side view of the human brain, pictured above, is from a study by French physician and anatomist Jean-Baptiste Marc Bourgery. Atlas of Human Anatomy and Surgery. First published in 1831, this is known as the most comprehensive manual ever produced on human anatomy.

Courtesy of Ministry of Heritage and Cultural Activities (MiBACT), National Central Library of Florence, No Reproduction;  The Hebrew University of Jerusalem;  Courtesy of Ministry of Heritage and Cultural Activities (MiBACT), National Central Library of Florence, No Reproduction

Courtesy of Ministry of Heritage and Cultural Activities (MiBACT), National Central Library of Florence, No Reproduction; The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Courtesy of Ministry of Heritage and Cultural Activities (MiBACT), National Central Library of Florence, No Reproduction

The three images above show, from left to right: nerve synapses called Held’s chalices, drawn in 1934 by Santiago RamÓn y Cajal, whose doctrine of neurons showed that the nervous system is not continuous, but is made up of discrete cells; Albert Einstein’s 1905 sketch of a puzzle game from his relativity notebook; and watercolor illustrations of the moon by Galileo Galilei, based on observations made with a telescope he built in 1609 that was powerful enough to examine objects in the night sky.

Two giant donuts of charged particles called the Van Allen belts surround the Earth

NASA/T. Benesch, J. Carns

Above is NASA’s 2012 image of two “donuts” of charged particles, or plasma, surrounding the Earth, an example of how computer graphics have created more accurate and realistic representations of unseen phenomena. These rings are called Van Allen radiation belts. NASA launched two probes in 2012 to better understand these regions and space weather more broadly.

“Scientific illustrations help convey… complex scientific concepts,” explains EscardÓ. “Even today…there is still a need to use illustration as a tool to capture images that can only be achieved through this medium.”

Learn more about these topics:

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Enchanting Vignettes Woodcut Illustrations https://samt2010.org/enchanting-vignettes-woodcut-illustrations/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 15:18:58 +0000 https://samt2010.org/enchanting-vignettes-woodcut-illustrations/ Encircled by coarsely textured bark, fine woodcuts become canvases for the landscapes and whimsical scenes illustrated by Melpomeni Chatzipanagiotou. Using a combination of pen, ink, gouache and acrylic paint, the Greek artist draws exterior vignettes masked with cosmic patterns and details. Last year (2016) I started working on a series of woodblock illustrations. It started […]]]>

Encircled by coarsely textured bark, fine woodcuts become canvases for the landscapes and whimsical scenes illustrated by Melpomeni Chatzipanagiotou. Using a combination of pen, ink, gouache and acrylic paint, the Greek artist draws exterior vignettes masked with cosmic patterns and details.

Last year (2016) I started working on a series of woodblock illustrations. It started as an experiment and to explore a different surface, an outlet for the daily use of paper. There is something scenic about working on wood, it can transport you and it gives added meaning and purpose to the work. Nature has always given me great inspiration and this time I tried to capture the essence of the earth, long fields, high mountains and plants, sometimes even exploring different themes and subjects. Nature holds harmony and purity. For those who want to listen to him, I believe he has a lot to teach us.

– Melpomeni Chatzipanagiotou

Chatzipanagiotou’s heavily modeled woodcuts are embellished with cosmic details that add a touch of whimsy to natural scenes. The night sky is full of snowflakes; Deer dash throws a starlit forest. Chatzipanagiotou’s paintings will bewitch you and transport you to a magical world.

On Etsy, there are many wood and paper graphics by Chatzipanagiotou that you can purchase from her Etsy shop. You can also see his woodcut illustrations on Instagram. She also has two coloring books “Circle of Life” and “Nature Mandalas”, if you want to fill her whimsical landscape with your imaginative touch.

This article may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, Design Swan may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more information.

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Made in St. Louis: Pencil illustrations capture the heart of St. Louis | Lifestyles https://samt2010.org/made-in-st-louis-pencil-illustrations-capture-the-heart-of-st-louis-lifestyles/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://samt2010.org/made-in-st-louis-pencil-illustrations-capture-the-heart-of-st-louis-lifestyles/ By Pat Eby Special for the Post-Dispatch Artist Joseph Bodus finds inspiration close to home in the buildings, history, sports teams, landmarks and culture of St. Louis. He captures the moments that ignite his imagination in meticulous pencil drawings that are dynamic in composition and perfectly rendered. “I have been doing art forever – since […]]]>

By Pat Eby Special for the Post-Dispatch

Artist Joseph Bodus finds inspiration close to home in the buildings, history, sports teams, landmarks and culture of St. Louis. He captures the moments that ignite his imagination in meticulous pencil drawings that are dynamic in composition and perfectly rendered.

“I have been doing art forever – since I was a young boy. I have always loved art very much, so in the fall of 1999 I started studying art at Florissant Valley Community College,” explains Bodus, “I graduated as an associate’s degree in graphic design, then in the fall of 2003 I transferred to the Kansas City Art Institute, where I earned a bachelor’s degree in illustration.”






Artist Joseph Bodus


Bodus held various jobs after college in graphic design for large agencies and small freelancers, and even worked in graphic design for a newspaper. During the 2008-2009 recession, he lost his full-time job. “After the ‘big layoff’, it took me 16 months to find another job. I started making art and selling at arts and crafts fairs around this time to make some money.

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In 2010, he found work as a web designer and graphic designer for a large organization and stayed there for five and a half years. He continued to sell art on the art fair circuit, but fate intervened. “I was laid off again on September 22, 2016, my birthday. I received a great birthday present. I took a leap of faith and walked out to take my art business to the higher level.

Get the ball rolling • Bodus has enjoyed sports, especially baseball, since he was a child. “I grew up in a neighborhood where all my friends played sports. My best friend happens to be a sports fanatic. We were always playing something – a game of football, backyard soccer, a home run derby, street hockey and basketball after school almost every day in high school,” he says.

Although Bodus played organized baseball in elementary school, swimming was his favorite sport in middle school and later high school in Pattonville.

For the love of games • Today, his fine pencil drawings recreate moments from every St. Louis sports team. They feature both history and stories of top players, stadiums and venues. His booth at art shows must be a sports fan’s happy place for memorable and meaningful art.

“When I’m at shows, people say ‘Oh, I remember that moment in the game’ or ‘I was in the stands that day’ when they look at my sports art,” he says.

“I know with the departure of Yadier Molina and the retirement of Adam Wainwright, a lot of people will remember this season. I have a drawing of them two together,” he said.

Connect with your fanbase • Bodus goes far beyond sport in its love for Saint-Louis. It has a strong connection with its monuments, historic buildings and vibrant cultural life. “A lot of clients who come to my shows like to tell me their stories about the places I’ve drawn and they’ve visited,” he says. “People who were there before 1959 remember when the Arena had towers.”

“I do a lot of art fairs throughout the year, an average of 16 to 20 in a normal year,” says Bodus. “I post fair dates and locations on my Facebook page in my pre-show feed.”

He captured the palpable energy of the Fox Theater in his dynamic take on its famous marquee. His rendering of the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis in minute detail with its rose window and towering spiers retains faint perspective lines along the roofs, much like Old Master drawings.

Hitting his stride • Bodus is currently preparing for a series of fall art exhibitions in the metro area. “I feel like I’m working almost 24 hours a day, but it’s at my own pace. I can take a break whenever I want,” he says.

Yet he hasn’t looked back in six and a half years after leaving the corporate world. “I believe in my heart that this was the right decision. I love what I do and can’t wait to see where my art can take me,’ he wrote on his Etsy page where the well-stocked store shows its artwork to good effect.

Family • Joseph and his wife, Tara, have two daughters, Liliana, 11, and Isabella, 7.

What he does • Bodus is a skilled graphic designer and illustrator who pencils in fine detail of historic buildings, landmarks, and iconic sports in St. Louis and surrounding towns. He draws using a technique that gives a vintage look to his art. He says his art “creates a moment or a memory in time for people”.

Or buy • Bodus sells his work online on his Etsy site, etsy.com/shop/JBDesignIllustration. Artisans in the Loop in University City carries its works locally. He also sells at art exhibitions throughout the year, which he posts regularly on his Facebook page. He will exhibit at the Midwest Salute to the Masters in Fairview Heights, the Greentree Festival in Kirkwood and the Edwardsville Art Fair. Interested parties can contact him at jbodus@sbcglobal.net.

How much • Bodus sells limited editions of signed and numbered prints from his pencil drawings as well as open editions of certain prints. It offers matted and framed prints as well as unmatted prints ranging from $20 to $300. It also sells magnets and greeting cards in the $5-6 range. Coasters featuring an image, sold in sets of four, including a tray, are $50 per set. Original designs are also available, priced at $2,500 to $4,000 or more.

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Sisi Kim’s playful 3D illustrations are far from disposable https://samt2010.org/sisi-kims-playful-3d-illustrations-are-far-from-disposable/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 08:30:47 +0000 https://samt2010.org/sisi-kims-playful-3d-illustrations-are-far-from-disposable/ Most creatives have several reasons why they chose their preferred medium. For Sisi Kim, it’s a love of anything that looks plastic. Grabbing 3D illustration for its ability to best represent the material’s key characteristics – “lightness, playfulness and color” – Sisi’s work can be bold and bright, but it’s certainly not disposable. Inspired by […]]]>

Most creatives have several reasons why they chose their preferred medium. For Sisi Kim, it’s a love of anything that looks plastic. Grabbing 3D illustration for its ability to best represent the material’s key characteristics – “lightness, playfulness and color” – Sisi’s work can be bold and bright, but it’s certainly not disposable. Inspired by lighthearted subject matter, like internet memes, childhood toys, and ’90s pop art, Sisi also interacts with bigger issues, like the impending climate crisis.

In A messy day – a brilliantly moving and apocalyptic piece – Sisi compares the frustration of discarded chewing gum and climate change. “As trivial in appearance as chewing gum sticking to our feet, climate change seems ignorant and irritating, but it continues to influence our lives and becomes increasingly difficult to solve,” explains the illustrator. In another recent project, Too cute to be just plastic, Sisi depicted 100 plastic objects in her charming style, immortalizing objects and challenging our tendency to throw things away. While Sisi might be one of the funniest wallets we’ve come across lately, it also packs a mighty punch with an undercurrent of social commentary.

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