Illustrations – SAMT 2010 http://samt2010.org/ Tue, 10 May 2022 17:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://samt2010.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-1-32x32.png Illustrations – SAMT 2010 http://samt2010.org/ 32 32 Melcher Oosterman creates intricate and colorful illustrations without even planning them https://samt2010.org/melcher-oosterman-creates-intricate-and-colorful-illustrations-without-even-planning-them/ Tue, 10 May 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://samt2010.org/melcher-oosterman-creates-intricate-and-colorful-illustrations-without-even-planning-them/ A self-confessed late bloomer in reading and writing, Melcher was first drawn to illustrations as a child because they offered him another way to express himself and communicate. It’s an approach that has clearly paid off as now, as an adult, he’s an in-demand artist who has worked for Vice, De Correspondent, Illustratie Biennale and […]]]>

A self-confessed late bloomer in reading and writing, Melcher was first drawn to illustrations as a child because they offered him another way to express himself and communicate. It’s an approach that has clearly paid off as now, as an adult, he’s an in-demand artist who has worked for Vice, De Correspondent, Illustratie Biennale and many more.

In his youth, Franco-Belgian comics gave Melcher an indication of how he could turn his artistic fascination into a career. Although the idea of ​​creating comics with characters and stories seemed like too daunting a commitment, he soon realized that unique images like editorial illustrations would give him the ability to tell an entire story.

“As I got older I became obsessed with drawing, and after seeing editorial illustrations in De Volkskrant (a major Dutch newspaper) it all made sense to me. This is how you make a living drawing” , Melcher told Creative Boom. “The images there communicated everything you needed to know on one page.”



He adds that from there, “I researched illustrators around the world and started collecting their zines and prints to learn as much as I could. The world of illustration opened up to me. and I understood the endless possibilities. With drawing as a foundation, everything is possible: animation, ceramics, Riso printing, screen printing, murals and much more.

“At the moment I feel like I’ve barely scratched the surface and knowing how much I still don’t know about illustration really excites me for the future.”

From this wealth of inspiration and talent, a few chosen names rise to the top of Melcher’s influences. In particular: Tove Jansson. “His ability to create such delicate and whimsical worlds with an endless cast of charming characters is insane,” says Melcher. “I’ve never watched the Moomins much, but lately I’ve been watching his work a lot. I find a sense of comfort and calm in his work.”

A big part of the fun of creating is seeing things appear on paper as if I had no control over them.

Kiyoshi Awazu is another great inspiration whom Melcher considers an “absolute mastermind” when it comes to color and creativity. Drawing on folk themes and historical printing methods, Kiyoshi’s work encompasses graphic design, and it’s easy to see between his work and that of Melcher.

Another great influence on Melcher is Seymour Chwast’s absurd humor, particularly the way he pushes the boundaries of what is acceptable in mainstream illustrations and graphic art. “He’s also been doing illustrations for over six decades now, and I really hope to stay in the illustration game as long as he has.”

Beyond the art world, Melcher has recently begun to draw a lot of inspiration from nature, the world and the people around him. “My girlfriend is from North Devon, and every time we visit her family I am truly amazed by the scenery. It feels like something out of a Studio Ghibli movie, especially when she leads me on these back roads through dreamy hills.”




These influences were distilled by Melcher to create an art style he describes as “an eclectic mix of colourful, vibrant and detailed worlds inhabited by humorous and sometimes tragic characters”. These characters are the basis of Melcher’s work, although lately he’s been keen to explore world-building and create unique universes within the various projects he’s working on.

“I paid more attention to the landscape around me,” says Melcher. “I cycle almost every day and watch the environment change. I live in Rotterdam, a fairly large city that was destroyed in World War II. Most of the classic Dutch architectural details have disappeared and the city has been rebuilt in a wild mix of modern architecture and high rise buildings.

“There are so many strange objects and architectural experiments. Thanks to excellent cycling infrastructure and public transport, I have many opportunities to observe my immediate surroundings. The people and animals I observe are so fascinating that I can’t help but draw them.”




If you are familiar with Melcher’s work, you will notice that tragic and humorous characters are a staple of his portfolio. Although it’s something he admits he may soon be moving away from, in part because he’s not focused as much on producing self-portraits that often had a darker outlook.

“I was doing self-portraits with a lot of humor to get out of those moods, and I think that’s how I started to see that element of tragicomedy in other people too,” he reveals. . “It’s important to take your work seriously, but you shouldn’t take yourself too seriously. Also, it’s much more interesting to draw characters with emotional depth rather than characters that are always happy or always sad. Opposites can coexist.” -exist and do interesting work.”

All the mistakes and little accidents that come from not drawing really add to my work.

In addition to being loaded with humor and charm, Melcher’s illustrations are explosively colorful. Yet he always seems to know how to balance his palette for maximum impact. How is it? “It’s like a puzzle for me,” he says. “If I’m working in color digitally, I start with any color that matches the mood and slowly build around that color until it gets too chaotic, and I might have to drop a few -ones.

“In the piece, I try to avoid elements of the same color touching each other, which really makes work a big puzzle where I have to put all the right elements together. If the coloring is done by analogy, the process is easier. I’ve already drawn the whole line art, so I can’t stop working on the part just because I missed a color. Basically, I just have to make it work.




And while this use of color seems carefully thought out, Melcher doesn’t weigh down her work by meticulously examining how all the elements work together, which is impressive because her illustrations can be a complex web of details and characters all interacting with a. another.

“I avoid planning as much as possible,” he admits. “A big part of the fun of creating is seeing things appear on paper as if I had no control over them.

“Before, I was a big perfectionist. I could spend so much time planning and sketching a design before I even started the creative process. These days, I feel like all the mistakes and small accidents that come from not drawing really add up to naïve compositions and awkward poses, but these imperfections give a personal, human touch to my illustrations.

“It’s also why I work with both analog and digital media – the limitations of pen and paper push me to find creative solutions, and the digital aspect brings a layer of depth afterwards. A wobbly or blotchy line and the texture of a Our brush pen is something you cannot imitate and is therefore much more interesting to me than a perfect, anatomically correct illustration with straight lines.”




Melcher’s illustrations are stunning, dynamic, and seem to burst off the page. It’s an apt reflection of how his mind works, as he’s constantly spinning new ideas in his head. The only downside to this prolific prospect is that he can’t find the time to work on everything he wants. But for those struggling with creative block, how does Melcher keep his imagination refreshed and engaged?

“Always keeping an open mind and trying to stay on top of everything visual,” he reveals. “I have trained my eyes to look at anything without judging its quality or comparing it to previous things I see. You can take inspiration from anything, but you have to actively seek it out. There is beauty everywhere as long as you are curious and almost look at the world with the naivety of a child.

“By actively looking at the world with a sense of wonder and respecting your subjects, inspiration is abundant. I avoid looking too much at other illustrators to prevent my work from following trends.”




]]>
New DNF Duel Trailer Focuses On Character Artwork https://samt2010.org/new-dnf-duel-trailer-focuses-on-character-artwork/ Fri, 06 May 2022 16:00:51 +0000 https://samt2010.org/new-dnf-duel-trailer-focuses-on-character-artwork/ A new DNF Dueling trailer focusing on its characters is here, and it teases more news and content. The first half of the video focuses on illustrations of his fighters. These appear to be shots taken from an arcade or story mode. The description included a note that read, “We’ll be back soon with more […]]]>

A new DNF Dueling trailer focusing on its characters is here, and it teases more news and content. The first half of the video focuses on illustrations of his fighters. These appear to be shots taken from an arcade or story mode. The description included a note that read, “We’ll be back soon with more news for you!” This could refer to more fashion and roster news.

The illustrations in the DNF Dueling The trailer begins by showing the characters Berserker and Grappler. Berserker is surrounded by enemies, while Grappler is surrounded by fallen enemies. After that, the Inquisitor appears holding his axe. The following image features an encounter between the Hitman and the Ranger. She is followed by the Kunoichi to a town, leaning against a wall as she observes the others. The Crusader appears to be working with the Ghostblade in the next shot. Finally, there is a moment that shows the Vanguard and the Berserker face to face. From there, the video shows combat footage.

Here is the new DNF Dueling trailer showing characters and art.

A few cast members do not appear in the teaser artwork. The Dragon Knight and Striker were both absent. It also didn’t show a character that Arc System Works had been teasing for a while. It’s the mechanic.

DNF Dueling some will be on PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5 and PC on June 28, 2022. Pre-orders are open.

]]>
Reza Hasni’s energetic illustrations are fueled by joy and positivity https://samt2010.org/reza-hasnis-energetic-illustrations-are-fueled-by-joy-and-positivity/ Wed, 04 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://samt2010.org/reza-hasnis-energetic-illustrations-are-fueled-by-joy-and-positivity/ “My works are a contemporary reflection of our world and its unseen energies,” says Reza Hasni, a Singapore-born illustrator-stroke-artist currently based in Berlin. One look at his works and you’ll instantly grasp this energy and the recurring themes it draws on: elements such as “sacred geometry” as well as references to the internet, pop and […]]]>

“My works are a contemporary reflection of our world and its unseen energies,” says Reza Hasni, a Singapore-born illustrator-stroke-artist currently based in Berlin. One look at his works and you’ll instantly grasp this energy and the recurring themes it draws on: elements such as “sacred geometry” as well as references to the internet, pop and pop culture. clubs.

Liveliness is certainly what drives Reza’s illustrations. From the fantastical to the downright unrealistic, each work is peppered with a dreamlike quality that makes it a joy to observe and intriguing to discover. To begin with, Reza uses her medium to express her thoughts and stories about the made-up world she forms in her head. She describes these ideas as a “visual diary of images,” she tells us, “that often become a visual representation of an alternate world. It’s a form of escape for me.” In doing so, she deconstructs and reconstructs her stories to create her own visual language. It’s a process that seems quite therapeutic, his way of manifesting his point of view. “In my alternate world, we are not limited by the constraints of the physical world, such as geography or gravity.”



© Reza Hasni

© Reza Hasni



© Reza Hasni

Everything she creates is fueled by positivity and splashed with color. And let’s not forget the cryptic messages she weaves into her creative compositions. “It’s very imaginative, a bit witty and pushes viewers to dare to dream,” she adds. “It encourages them to think that it’s okay to be pushed out of the comfortable spaces or patterns they’re used to and explore the unknown. Because drawers change the world and curious minds us propel forward. These alternate worlds are ways to relearn our own realities.”

What’s also interesting is Reza’s fusion of 2D illustration and movement, fueling his interests in live visual performance, music, installation, augmented reality and fashion. A multitude of works encompass this multidisciplinary aspect of her practice, including a piece entitled Barker (Leisure system) which she created for Sam Barker’s show and a video dedicated to her family. Reza worked with a collection of video footage of his family, combining his illustrative style with animation to produce a psychedelic “cosmic adventure”.

© Reza Hasni



© Reza Hasni

© Reza Hasni



© Reza Hasni

© Reza Hasni



© Reza Hasni

CAT: Center for Altered Togetherness is another example, conceived as his second solo exhibition to date. An audio-visual experience comprising six different worlds that users can travel through on their desktop computer, the project is a collaboration between herself, interaction designer Screensavers and curator Mama Magnet. He was born in confinement, and the team collaborated virtually. “For me, the idea was not just to present static works, but to create a whole new experience to browse art, be a part of it and participate in it,” Reza notes. “It was empowering to build an online world where everyone could escape in their own minds as we all struggled with the complexities of a lack of physical contact.”

Going forward, Reza hopes her audience will continue to interact with her work in many ways – she wants to bring new experiences to the viewer. Additionally, her first visual performance with DK and producer Barker (Leisure System) is launching as we speak, and she also has exciting plans to launch a collection with a fashion house later this year. The horizon promises to be bright and varied for this marvelous artist.

© Reza Hasni



© Reza Hasni

© Reza Hasni



© Reza Hasni

© Reza Hasni



© Reza Hasni

]]>
Yann Kebbi’s set illustrations are a “drawn documentary” https://samt2010.org/yann-kebbis-set-illustrations-are-a-drawn-documentary/ Tue, 03 May 2022 06:54:30 +0000 https://samt2010.org/yann-kebbis-set-illustrations-are-a-drawn-documentary/ “When I dreamed about C’mon C’mon, I often thought, ‘It’s a drawing, not a painting,'” writes director Mike Mills in the introduction to C’mon Cmon: Drawings From the Set. The book brings together some of the hundreds of illustrations created by Yann Kebbi on the set of the film, which tells the story of a […]]]>

“When I dreamed about C’mon C’mon, I often thought, ‘It’s a drawing, not a painting,'” writes director Mike Mills in the introduction to C’mon Cmon: Drawings From the Set. The book brings together some of the hundreds of illustrations created by Yann Kebbi on the set of the film, which tells the story of a radio journalist’s road trip with his young nephew.

“I envisioned something in color to break up my black and white film and bring something other than ‘me’ and my point of view (and my drawings) to this otherwise very personal film,” Mills writes, who has also directed music videos for the likes of The National and Blonde Redhead. “I loved the idea of ​​another voice in the mix, and had a hunch to bring someone on set to draw while we were filming – but not exactly what we were filming.”

Mills commissioned Kebbi – an artist who has exhibited in Paris and Hong Kong, and worked for the Guardian and the Wall Street Journal – after coming across his work online. The illustrator joined the film crew in Los Angeles and took to drawing with such enthusiasm that Mills said he often had to be asked to “draw more quietly” by the person taking the sound.

Although the director originally planned to include Kebbi’s work in the film, he eventually realized that the illustrations would be too distracting for the audience – hence the book, published by A24. There are over 100 images in total, many of which come with comments from Mills. Kebbi’s scratchy style is perfectly suited to the ephemeral nature of film sets, juxtaposing moments from the film with images of the surrounding neighborhood.

“This book is a weird and wonderful accompaniment to the film, an extension of its mood, a kind of drawn documentary; a view of this world from a different person’s point of view and medium,” says Mills.

C’mon C’mon: Drawings From the Set is published by A24; boutique.a24films.com

]]>
Satyajit Ray and Mitchel camera artwork from ‘Pather Panchali’ at display-Entertainment News, Firstpost https://samt2010.org/satyajit-ray-and-mitchel-camera-artwork-from-pather-panchali-at-display-entertainment-news-firstpost/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 07:52:18 +0000 https://samt2010.org/satyajit-ray-and-mitchel-camera-artwork-from-pather-panchali-at-display-entertainment-news-firstpost/ The exhibit at the Kolkata Film Festival features the synthesizer used by Ray to compose the music for “Ghare Baire” and the Mitchel camera used to make “Pather Panchali”. An exhibition on the birth centenary of legendary filmmaker Satyajit Ray opened at the Kolkata International Film Festival on Tuesday. The exhibition, opened by his son […]]]>

The exhibit at the Kolkata Film Festival features the synthesizer used by Ray to compose the music for “Ghare Baire” and the Mitchel camera used to make “Pather Panchali”.

An exhibition on the birth centenary of legendary filmmaker Satyajit Ray opened at the Kolkata International Film Festival on Tuesday. The exhibition, opened by his son Sandip Ray, features several sections on his life and works, in addition to rare frames from classics such as ‘Aranyer Din Ratri‘, ‘Kapurush O Mahapurush‘ and ‘Devi‘.

The exhibit, on-going at the Nandan film center, also showcases the synthesizer Ray used to compose the music for ‘Ghare Baire‘ and the camera Mitchel used to make ‘Pather Panchali‘.

Ray, the illustrator and graphic designer, has also found a place in the exhibition where his sketches for advertisements, cover illustrations for his literary works and small magazines are presented. “The exhibit is well planned and executed, covering different aspects of my father. Although many exhibits, including photos, are from us and the Ray Society, I am pleasantly surprised to see many other items that I don’t didn’t know,” Sandip told Ray.

The exhibition was conceptualized by painter Suvaprasanna, while filmmaker Sudeshna Roy curated it. “Glad it went so well. The Ray family was a huge help,” Roy said. Filmmaker Goutam Ghosh shared some experiences of making Ray, his documentary on the maestro, at the opening of the exhibition.
“I have fond memories of working with Manikda (as Ray was affectionately called by his friends),” Ghosh said.

Director Shoojit Sircar said he was delighted to stand next to the Mitchell camera Ray used in the 1950s.
Two other exhibitions – on Hungarian filmmaker Miklos Jansco and film historian and critic Chidananda Dasgupta – also took place during the day at Gaganendra Pradarshansala. The festival, inaugurated on Monday, will continue until May 1.

Read all Latest news, New trends, Cricket News, bollywood news, India News and Entertainment News here. follow us on Facebook, Twitter and instagram.

]]>
Art in the Park: a celebration of book illustrations and hosting an NFT market https://samt2010.org/art-in-the-park-a-celebration-of-book-illustrations-and-hosting-an-nft-market/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 16:03:09 +0000 https://samt2010.org/art-in-the-park-a-celebration-of-book-illustrations-and-hosting-an-nft-market/ THREE weeks after welcoming more than 16,000 guests to the hybrid Art Fair Philippines, the fair’s affordable counterpart, Art in the Park, opened on April 24. Until May 1 at www.artinthepark.ph, the art fair will feature a physical activity day on April 28 at Jaime C. Velasquez Park in Makati City. This year, Art in […]]]>

THREE weeks after welcoming more than 16,000 guests to the hybrid Art Fair Philippines, the fair’s affordable counterpart, Art in the Park, opened on April 24. Until May 1 at www.artinthepark.ph, the art fair will feature a physical activity day on April 28 at Jaime C. Velasquez Park in Makati City.

This year, Art in the Park features 61 galleries, art schools, independent art spaces, art collectives and, for the first time, an NFT (non-fungible token) marketplace. Artwork prices are capped at 50,000 pesos.

“We pushed everything back because of the Omicron wave in January,” Art in the Park co-founder and organizer Trickie Lopa told reporters in an April 21 Zoom interview.

Ms. Lopa, along with fellow co-founders Lisa Ongpin-Periquet and Geraldine “Dindin” Araneta – all three are also the founders of Art Fair Philippines – decided to keep most of the fair online to avoid the risk of overcrowding in the park, and spend a day there during the eight-day event.

ENG INK
Two of the featured artists at the fair with special exhibits are Ang Illustrador ng Kabataan (Ang INK) and Distort Monsters.

In accordance with their 30and anniversary, Ang INK will present a special exhibition titled “INK in the Park”, featuring a collection of 40 artworks by various illustrators.

Artist, painter and children’s book illustrator Jomike Tejido said it was the first time the group had been highlighted with a special exhibition after 16 years of attending the art fair.

“The fair has helped us bring out our creative talents outside of our usual platform as illustrations published in Filipino children’s books and magazines,” Tejido said. Business world in an email. He noted that Art in the Park gave them the opportunity to be appreciated by art collectors and showcase their graphic creations.

Ang INK’s special exhibition features 40 illustrators, including Juno Abreu, Aldy Aguirre, Fran Alvarez, Jamie Bauza, Benedir Dasig, Jovan De Ocampo, Danielle Florendo, Liza Flores, Tin Javier, Jasmin Lacay, LD Mendoza, Arli Pagaduan, Jonathan Ranola, Mark L Ruste, Jomike Tejido and Ige Ochoa Trinidad.

Meanwhile, their regular stand will showcase 100 works by 16 artists. “Our regular booth has an open theme, where we showcase each of our individual styles and interests in the field,” Tejido said. “Visitors may be able to obtain a timeless piece from their favorite children’s book illustrators.”

Ang INK has 50-60 active members every year. “Membership is renewed every year. The list of active members changes from year to year,” former Ang INK president Liza Flores said in an email.

For three decades, Ang INK has been striving “to improve the quality of its members’ work, to set a standard for the Philippine children’s book industry in craftsmanship as well as business practices, to expand its reach and its influence in other parts of the Philippines,” Ms. Flores said, and for the Philippines to be known internationally for having diverse, imaginative and world-class artwork for children.

In December 2021, Ang INK opened its 30and year anniversary exhibition at the Ateneo Art Gallery.

DEFORMING MONSTERS
Street artist Distort Monsters (real name: Miguel Antonio) bridges digital and traditional art with “Monster Mayhem Megamash”.

Art in the Park will feature 100 pieces from Part 2 of “Monster Mayhem MegaMash,” which features the artist’s colorful creatures in two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and digital forms, from murals to NFTs (non-fungible tokens). These unique monsters will be available on www.artinthepark.ph in the form of giclée prints containing unique QR codes which, when activated, will allow buyers of the prints to embed the images as NFTs which they will also own.

Priced at P9,500, the concept for the online exhibition comes from Blindboxes, where buyers don’t know which of the 100 unique and NFT prints they’ve purchased until the giclee prints are delivered to them.

“One of the main objectives of the Monster Mayhem [project] is to connect my physical art to the digital world and then back to the real world,” Antonio told reporters in a Zoom interview on April 21.

Antonio said they offer generative NFTs which are digital art that carries design assets embedded in a specific program. “Each asset or trait has a certain percentage of rarity, and what the program does is it takes all of those traits to put together a totally unique image,” he explained.

A live installation of 10 three-foot-tall resin sculptures will complement the online exhibit of “Monster Mayhem MegaMash.” They will be on display at Jaime Velasquez Park from April 24 to May 1.

ONLINE AND LIVE EVENTS
Complementing the online exhibitions at Art in the Park, online events will be held via Facebook Live (www.facebook.com/artintheparkph). These include the first video of the Studio 1616 exhibition on April 25 at 5:30 p.m.; the video showing INK STORY: 30 years of illustrating Kabataan April 26, 5 p.m., followed by a panel discussion on video with members of Ang INK and the Ateneo Art Gallery, 5:30 p.m.; Distort Monsters’ first video Monster Mayhem Megamash April 27, 5:30 p.m.; and the Platinum Series art activity for kids on April 30 at 10 a.m.

In the meantime, here are the live events taking place on April 28 (4-8 p.m.) at Jaime Velasquez Park in Salcedo Village, Makati:

Distort Monsters will be holding a live mural session starting at 3 p.m. Mr. Antonio will also discuss his Monster Mayhem MegaMash project, and how it bridges the gap between traditional art and NFTs in a talk scheduled for 5 p.m. the same day.

The exhibition of new works by Ang INK which will be available for purchase that day.

Installation of Studio 1616, Reflect Divert live.

A two-hour DJ set by After the Noon Records from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Food and beverages will also be available at the park.

Art in the Park is organized by Philippine Art Events, Inc., for the benefit of the Museum Foundation of The Philippines and with the support of Globe Platinum and Bank of The Philippine Islands.

For more information and the full schedule of activities, visit www.artinthepark.ph and follow www.facebook/artinthepark and @artintheparkph on Instagram. — Michelle Anne P. Soliman

]]>
Megan Du on Creating Bright and Bold Illustrations Fascinated by Retro-Futurism https://samt2010.org/megan-du-on-creating-bright-and-bold-illustrations-fascinated-by-retro-futurism/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 05:15:00 +0000 https://samt2010.org/megan-du-on-creating-bright-and-bold-illustrations-fascinated-by-retro-futurism/ Originally from China, Megan Du is a London-based artist who studied illustration at the University of the Arts London. Her desire to be an illustrator dates back to her childhood when her family praised her drawings and displayed them all over the living room wall. “It was like my first mini exhibit,” Megan told Creative […]]]>

Originally from China, Megan Du is a London-based artist who studied illustration at the University of the Arts London. Her desire to be an illustrator dates back to her childhood when her family praised her drawings and displayed them all over the living room wall. “It was like my first mini exhibit,” Megan told Creative Boom.

At the same time, she was constantly exposed to comics, magazines, and picture books with the goal of becoming a painter or fashion designer when she grew up. “To this day, I still miss the summers of my childhood, when I lay on the floor and sketched while watching cartoons, surrounded by my favorite comics and magazines and a seemingly endless supply of cold watermelon, sour plum soup and ice cream.



However, dreams are never easy things to achieve, and it was while pursuing her artistic aspirations in her home country that she ran into obstacles. “I learned that every Chinese student who wants to study art or design at university must take an art exam,” she explains. “To pass this exam, Chinese students will receive about six months of artistic training, during which everyone is asked to draw the same things with the same tools and methods, which I found very frustrating and uninteresting.”

This process made Megan skeptical of drawing for a long time, so instead of sketching, she switched gears and specialized in visual communication. “I thought it was a very free area and you could express yourself however you wanted.” It wasn’t until an instructor showed Megan magazines and freelance comics from America and Europe that she decided to get back to drawing.

“This long-lost passion filled my heart and I decided to start drawing again,” she says. “I found a lot of magazine editors from the UK and Europe in a comic shop, so I decided to study illustration in London and work as a freelance illustrator.”







Growing up in a rapidly developing era of the internet, Megan has drawn creative inspiration from many different places. However, the female perspective is a constant that she wishes to privilege. “I always tell from a female perspective, with women as the main narrative,” she says. “I am also inspired by everyday emotional expressions and fantasies, and will record new stories that come to mind anytime and anywhere.”

Studying fashion design in college also had its perks, as Megan says it taught her how to create quirky character shapes and interesting costume compositions. “But honestly, what influenced me the most was the culture of vintage paper,” she reveals. “I love old posters, prints, matchboxes, posters of Shanghai in the Republic of China or some Czech illustrated books. The bright colors, fascinating textures and interesting typography have me hooked.”

Speaking of colors, hot pink is Megan’s favorite. “You can see bright pink in most of my work because I want to convey a happy, lively vibe, like the pink candies I ate as a kid.” As for the rest of her visual language, Megan’s undergraduate background in graphic design gave her work a decorative feel, with a flat perspective where the elements of images tend to be geometric. “My images are like a formalized play,” she says, “with each character framed in relatively static body language.”




Megan’s work has a wonderfully tactile quality, so it’s no surprise to learn that she still favors traditional ways of working. “I like to draw in pencil on paper first and then use my computer or iPad to work on it. Drawing on paper relieves me, and it’s okay to make a mistake and change paper.

“Even though we are now in the electronic age, paper is still irreplaceable in my mind. I have tried many printing methods over time, my favorites being risography and screen printing. Risography printing is so colorful and beautiful that I can’t get enough of it. I’m always exploring new areas, like clay, ceramics, papier-mâché sculpture, and sometimes working with a new tool that you’re not familiar with. familiar can produce great results.

On her website, Megan says she loves retro but goes against anything trendy. This stems from his fascination with vintage culture, particularly the colorful decade, the 80s. bring both upbeat romance and nostalgia to life.

“I am also fascinated by the printmaking of the last century where information was disseminated on paper and people used simple equipment to create unique and beautiful works. This influenced the aesthetics of my images. I use a few brushes to create textures and improve the grain of images, getting closer to the vintage aesthetic I have in mind through the print.”




As graduation nears the end of this academic year, what does Megan have in store? “I want to continue in the field of illustration,” she says. “I know it won’t be easy, and my dad told me to keep my feet on the ground, so I’m focusing more on the present than the future.

“I will continue to explore my personal style. I have already written new stories, and I want to try to create them and make new prints, magazines and comics using new printing techniques. In addition, I want to create images with more narration or try to create animated images and open more business collaborations.”







]]>
Represent a “slice of life” through illustrations https://samt2010.org/represent-a-slice-of-life-through-illustrations/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 19:45:31 +0000 https://samt2010.org/represent-a-slice-of-life-through-illustrations/ A woman draping a headscarf, holding a cup of nun-chai and listening to the radio while resting near the window – the illustration depicts the scene of a Kashmiri household and the mood of an illustrator. Depicting stories through comics and doodles, Ghazal Qadri is a Kashmiri illustrator whose vibrant and intricate illustrations have captured […]]]>

A woman draping a headscarf, holding a cup of nun-chai and listening to the radio while resting near the window – the illustration depicts the scene of a Kashmiri household and the mood of an illustrator.

Depicting stories through comics and doodles, Ghazal Qadri is a Kashmiri illustrator whose vibrant and intricate illustrations have captured the attention of many.

From everyday drama to unexpected events, she not only entertains but also enlightens with her creative content.

Under the name of Alif, she manages her Instagram page and her feed welcomes you to Kashmiri culture and language. She celebrates everyday life, brings issues and situations to light through her artistic work in a fun way.

Getting more creative with each stroke, his job is to place his doodles in front of a real background, which makes him come alive.

Ghazal has depicted what she calls “slices of life” through illustrations, comics, doodles and stickers. On the suggestions of her supporters, she recently launched her online store selling her merchandise with a Kashmiri touch. The collection includes enamel pins, coffee mugs, postcards, bookmarks and the Kashmiri stickers on sale.

Offering a variety of motley products with catchy Kashmiri phrases like Gul Kaak Bookmark, Shoede Bookmark, Pyaale Toath, Jahan Deed Postcard etc., her collection is what anyone would find adorable.

Ghazal was interested in cartoons from his school days. Due to the limited career options available to art lovers in Kashmir, she, with the baggage of passion, had to move abroad to pursue her education.

After completing her secondary education in Kashmir, she moved to Jaipur to pursue her higher secondary education. In 2013, she joined Bachelor of Design in Fashion and Lifestyle Accessories Design from NIFT, Hyderabad and then worked in a design studio as an illustrator for a few years. In 2020, she graduated from the Maryland Institute College of Art with a master’s degree in illustration. Since then, she has worked as a freelance illustrator represented by Pippins Properties Limited, a New York-based literary agency.

“The agency looks after my interests by promoting my portfolio of illustration work for comics, graphic novels and children’s picture books to potential clients around the world,” a- she declared.

She is already working on a picture book project at the request of the literary agency with a leading publisher and also independently manages her creative work including picture books, graphic novels, book illustrations , editorial illustrations, greeting cards, logos and more.

Some of the projects she has completed include illustration work for Aditi Rao’s Noon chai and a story – a picture book published by Tulika Publications, India, Allie the Albino Squirrel by Emily McCoy published by Atmosphere USA publishers and mascot design for Khyber Milk. .

She also produced playful characters and illustrations for the children’s book OkusBokus by writer-blogger Onaiza Drabu. The book introduces the lifestyle and culture of Kashmir to children through English alphabets.

Speaking about the book, she said, “I was seduced by the initiative to promote Kashmiri culture and language; the first of its kind. I was delighted to illustrate the book. Okus Bokus was my first illustrated picture book.

In the same year, she had the chance to take part in the collaborative illustration work for the calendar which celebrated the successful, but forgotten, women of Kashmir. The calendar was a great success and received wide appreciation.

For WhatsApp, one of the most popular social networking apps, Ghazal has also designed stickers with typical vernacular words and phrases.

The stickers/emojis are made up of Kashmiri characters wearing traditional outfits with catchy sayings and expressions.

“Whatsapp has launched sticker sending/sharing features on phones. It was a God sent opportunity. I adapted Kashmiri phrases to my artwork in png/jpg format. Emojis are currently used by over 2,00,000 users. It’s really overwhelming. I never thought something like this would happen,” she said.

She also works as an illustrator for Champak magazine and an online portal called Go Comics. She will also work with UNICEF on a series of comics on women’s education in Kashmir, in addition to a story with Pratham’s books on the spring season in Kashmir.

A picture book project she did with Funkaar International will also be released soon.She is currently working on two more picture books with two different US publishers and an Indian publisher.

“I’m really excited about the current projects. I am currently working on a children’s picture book which is my own story. I’m really excited because it’s all about Kashmir,” she said.

Currently, she is focused on building her brand in the form of her merchandise as well as collaborating with authors and writing her own stories for children’s books.

Drawing inspiration from everything and everyone she sees around, she tries to portray things that sometimes go unnoticed.

“My work mainly depicts my experiences in Kashmir in addition to other general observations in my life. I am happy that people like to engage with my simple slices of life,” she said.

Some of her favorite illustrators are Huda F, Gemma Corel, Alicia Souza, Mike Lowery, Priya Kurian, Oliver Jeffer, Jean Jullian and many more.

“I think people can identify with some of my works and that comforts them. I often get messages about how some of my works affect them emotionally,” she said.

While blessing the Instagram feed of users, nowadays for artists doodling has become a way to express their thoughts and creativity.

She said: “I think the mundane incidents depicted there strike a chord with social media users. Comics are engaging, funny, and engaging. Like I said before, I think people can relate to some of these works and it comforts them. »

However, she thinks the opportunities for artists in Kashmir are even less compared to other parts of the world.

“The fraternity of Kashmiri artists has become huge and very talented, growing day by day. Although the opportunities are lesser, artists these days have carved a niche for themselves to showcase their work. Social media undoubtedly plays a role key.

She believes that artists should be open to more collaborations and showcase their work online. “It would be the easiest and best solution for artists to get noticed and approached by different types of customers with opportunities,” she added.

Having the full support of her parents in choosing art as a career, she said, “I strongly believe that this is not possible without the constant support and encouragement of her family members or mentors.

She added that some children still face resentment from their parents for choosing art as a career.

When asked about her future plans, she said, “I’m not a planner, but I’m still very keen on illustrating and writing children’s books.”

]]>
Ink washed illustrations are unique lock journal https://samt2010.org/ink-washed-illustrations-are-unique-lock-journal/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 10:28:00 +0000 https://samt2010.org/ink-washed-illustrations-are-unique-lock-journal/ Ti Gong “Containment Diary” by Chinese ink wash painter Wang Hui. Shanghai may be under strict control, but the art is not. Chinese ink wash painter Wang Hui, in suburban Songjiang District, uses brushes and palettes to illustrate his love for the city and his utmost respect for those who offer a helping hand to […]]]>

Ti Gong

“Containment Diary” by Chinese ink wash painter Wang Hui.

Shanghai may be under strict control, but the art is not.

Chinese ink wash painter Wang Hui, in suburban Songjiang District, uses brushes and palettes to illustrate his love for the city and his utmost respect for those who offer a helping hand to the community in these times. difficult days.

A volunteer day patroller in the Shangshangyuan district where he lives, Wang always takes his camera with him and captures the moments that touch him. Back home in the evening, the painter brings to life what he sees and feels in ink and pigment on paper.

Ink washed illustrations are unique lock journal

Ti Gong

The head of the security guards in Shangshangyuan district, where Wang lives, carries goods for residents.

“As an art practitioner, I have a duty to record what is happening in the times we find ourselves in,” he said. “I am happy to be able to contribute to my community. I hope that the portraits of these volunteers that I have painted can bring them some comfort and show them my gratitude.”

In one image, four dabai or the “tall whites” (an affectionate nickname for medical workers because they’re dressed in all-white hazmat suits) make “heart” gestures in the neighborhood’s central park. Nurses from the Children’s Hospital in neighboring Zhejiang Province are helping with the PCR tests.

Ink washed illustrations are unique lock journal

Ti Gong

Four “tall whites” make gestures “from the heart” in the district’s central park.

“They didn’t know I was painting them,” Wang said. “I sent the board before they left, and the nurses were so excited they made a video thanking me. In fact, they’re the ones to thank.”

Since April 1, the day the west side of Huangpu River City was placed under lockdown, Wang began her “lockdown diary” by painting. So far, he’s filled 10 sketchbooks with dozens of drawings, ranging from a random doodle to a well-composed painting.

The lines are sprawling and flowing in a free and relaxing way, tinted with simple colors and large patches of black hues. While not sticking too precisely to the details, Wang elaborates on the wrinkles on the hazmat suits, the body gestures or movements of the figures, and the expressions in the eyes when the faces are hidden behind the masks. .

Ink washed illustrations are unique lock journal

Ti Gong

An exhausted worker is cared for.

In another table, a dabai falls into a chair, exhausted with a bowed head. His colleague fanned his face with a sheet of paper.

“It was a hot day, and the nurse could feel dizzy after long hours of work wrapped in tight-fitting protective clothing,” the painter recalls.

Wang donated a life-size photo of a volunteer carrying five heavy sacks of food on his back. It now hangs on the wall of the neighborhood committee office door.

“It’s my way of thanking everyone who helps me,” he said.

]]>
A local artist will teach illustration at the county library https://samt2010.org/a-local-artist-will-teach-illustration-at-the-county-library/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 18:59:24 +0000 https://samt2010.org/a-local-artist-will-teach-illustration-at-the-county-library/ Montgomery County Public Libraries (MCPL) will host free cartooning and graphic novel construction classes with local artist Leila Cabib. There will be five-session classes starting the weekend of April 22, according to a press release. Classes are divided into two sections. The first section is for comics if you are 50 or older and will […]]]>

Montgomery County Public Libraries (MCPL) will host free cartooning and graphic novel construction classes with local artist Leila Cabib. There will be five-session classes starting the weekend of April 22, according to a press release.

Classes are divided into two sections. The first section is for comics if you are 50 or older and will be held virtually. The second section is in person for those ages 10-15 who want to learn more about graphic novels.

Cabib has created two nationally syndicated comics, as listed on his website. Additionally, she currently teaches in Maryland schools.

Those who register for the course will have the opportunity to borrow art supplies. Loaned equipment must be returned after the last session. These supplies can be picked up at the Wheaton Library for virtual classes, according to the registration website.

Masks must be worn at the Wheaton Library for in-person sessions, located at 11702 Georgia Avenue, according to registration.

The first virtual cartoon workshop will take place on April 22 at 10 a.m. The Graphic Novel Session will begin April 23 at 10:30 a.m. at the Wheaton Library.

Photo courtesy of Leila Cabib’s website.

]]>